Mortimer Terrace Nature Reserve is an Asset of Community Value and much loved nature reserve originally established by a covenant in the late 19th Century, as a green buffer for the purpose of protecting the houses along Gordon House Road from the pollution of the railway network. It remains a vital lung for the local community who live on one of the busiest streets in the area as well as a offering a haven for wildlife.

Managed by the local community since 1987
Our very own local hero, Jeanne Pendrill, has been managed the site for over 30 years, for a time together with the London Wildlife Trust. Thanks to Jeanne’s hard work and an army of volunteers, the site has always been open to the community and local schools, clubs and groups. They have all had regular use of the site, always accessible, always free.

Site of Importance for Nature Conservation (Grade One)
Mortimer Terrace is a Grade One Site of Importance for Nature Conservation (SINC), it is featured in the Dartmouth Park Neighbourhood Forum Local Plan as a designated green space. The  local plan was adopted via referendum in 2019

Asset of Community Value
Mortimer Terrace Nature Reserve has been registered as an Asset of Community Value since 2016. It was one of the first designated ACV sites in Camden, the application was made by Jessica Jacobs and Emily O’Mara and submitted via Dartmouth Park Neighbourhood Forum. The renewal of the ACV was submitted by Emily O’Mara.

Woodland Tree Preservation Order
The reserve is also a rare Camden Woodland Tree Preservation Order, meaning not just one tree is protected but ALL trees.

Board of Trustees
In 2016 Mortimer Terrace formalised itself as a community managed nature reserve with constitution and board of Trustees. This constitution was renewed in 2018.

Under Threat from Speculative Buyers tempted by the Murphy’s Yard Development
In June 2019 the owners suddenly announced they were terminating the least and changed the locks on the site, arriving when schoolchildren from Gospel Oak school were visiting and telling them to leave. They locked the gates and put the site up for sale at auction – the community was mobilised to save the nature reserve, pushing through a stalled renewal of its status as an asset of community value. Thanks to the efforts of the trustees and the local community the owners had to remove the site from sale. The strength of community feeling remains strong and we are ready to purchase the land for the community.

Camden Community Makers made a short film about the pressures on the city farm and the nature reserve caused by the Murphy’s Yard Development.